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Did your grandparents or parents ever remark about how fruits and vegetables tasted better and even looked more appealing a generation ago? Well, maybe they’re not imagining all that.

Last November, a nationwide survey of over six thousand supplement users identified changes in the popularity of different brands and supplement types.

People have used the power of foods and herbs to enhance their love lives since time immemorial. Some of these foods have more of a scientific basis for being effective (note the zinc content of oysters) than others (powdered rhino horn). But besides oysters and heart-shaped pizza, other foods and herbs can enhance your love life, too.

Dear AllStarHealth, I’m a 48 yo male in good overall health. My late father had prostate cancer and his last few years were miserable. I’m quite concerned that I might develop it too.  We currently take a multi and fish oil and I also take a prostate product that has about 20 things in it. [...]

Dr. Robert Heaney is one of the leading researchers in the quickly-advancing field of vitamin D research. He recently gave a fascinating lecture at UC Berkley in which he summed up the most current information about vitamin D and took on difficult-to-answer questions about vitamin D deficiency and dose. Dr. Heaney’s information is compelling and commands a complete rethink of this crucial prohormone nutrient. The video has since been removed from YouTube, but we were able to see it and took some notes. Here’s what this leading researcher had to say about vitamin D.

Reducing calorie consumption is a proven way to lose weight, but people aren’t always disciplined enough to maintain a reduced calorie diet on their own. That accounts for some of the success and popularity of gastric bypass and gastric band surgeries, both of which reduce the quantity of calories absorbed.  But since both procedures carry [...]

Dear AllStarHealth.com,

I’ve noticed that some supplements list all their ingredients and tell you exactly how much of each one there is. Other products lump everything into a list like ‘Proprietary Blend’ or “Exclusive HyperDiet Complex” without specify ingredient amounts. Why do only some products specify amounts? I would think every customer wants or even needs to know that.

Best regards,

Tom Wilton

Dear Tom,

A lot of other customers have noticed this as well. Some have questioned whether this Proprietary Blend Approach is an attempt to conceal information from customers, such as a worrisome level of caffeine, sugars, or some other red-flag ingredient. While it’s true they’re trying to conceal information, they’re not trying to conceal it from you the customer.

We certainly agree with you that it’s in the customer’s best interest to see exact amounts of all ingredients in a product. And, actually, we’re sure that supplement companies themselves would agree also. We know them well and it’s clear that without exception they’re all really proud of their products and have nothing to hide. Nothing to hide, that is, from you.

How To Choose A Protein Powder

February 2nd, 2009

No matter where you buy supplements, chances are they have more protein powders than just about any other kind of product. That may be why one of the most common questions we receive is, simply, how do I choose one from among all these options? Well it’s really a very simple process once you understand some of the basics. Here’s a quick and easy guide to choosing a protein powder.

Mailbag: Best Vitamin E?

January 30th, 2009

Dear AllStarHealth,

I’ve always taken vitamin E because there’s a family history of heart disease and a few of my nutrition books say it’s beneficial. But in the last few years I’ve come across conflicting information about vitamin E including some recent news stories that say it doesn’t help and can actually be harmful to use vitamin E supplements. So what’s the story?

High-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is already the subject of controversy as a calorie-dense and nearly ubiquitous sweetening ingredient found in a disturbingly wide range of foods and drinks. Newly published findings add to those concerns by showing that many HFCS-containing foods have detectable limits of mercury.