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Posts Tagged ‘fructose’

A high-profile debate is taking place over the adverse effect of fructose sweeteners like high fructose corn syrup. On one side, the commercial sweetener industry employs fructose on a massive – and massively profitable – scale, the best example being the HFCS that’s in just about every supermarket food. The industry maintains that fructose is, essentially, no worse for you than other sugars, and they’ve enlisted the help of slick high-profile TV ads to advocate for the safety of high fructose corn syrup in a non-technical, feelgood sort of way (it’s ‘natural’, it’s ‘made from corn’, ‘real men’ don’t care, etc). On the other side are researchers and health professionals. These scientists have been searching for a way to explain the explosion in obesity and obesity harbingers like insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. This explosion more-or-less coincides with the introduction and rapid, widespread adoption of high fructose corn syrup. At this time in 2009, HFCS has already been the subject of many damaging studies, and while these researchers aren’t taking to the airwaves with their findings, the tide seems to be steadily turning against the industry as more consumers and health experts just put two-and-two together and finally steer clear of fructose sweeteners altogether.

High-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is already the subject of controversy as a calorie-dense and nearly ubiquitous sweetening ingredient found in a disturbingly wide range of foods and drinks. Newly published findings add to those concerns by showing that many HFCS-containing foods have detectable limits of mercury.

Nutrition News Roundup

September 15th, 2008

The stress herb that lowers cholesterol, another body blow for fructose, and a big sigh of relief for popcorn lovers. Here’s a roundup of the latest nutrition research.

The average American adult consumes over 50 grams of it a day, and the average teen over 70 grams. It’s not doing anyone any good,there are plenty of alternatives, yet it’s still used in so many foods and drinks, you’ll have lots of trouble avoiding it completely. Do you know what it is?